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Friday, May 8, 2020 | History

2 edition of Reducing natural ponderosa pine fuels using prescribed fire found in the catalog.

Reducing natural ponderosa pine fuels using prescribed fire

Stephen S Sackett

Reducing natural ponderosa pine fuels using prescribed fire

two case studies

by Stephen S Sackett

  • 281 Want to read
  • 2 Currently reading

Published by USDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station in [Fort Collins, Colo.] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Prescribed burning -- Arizona,
  • Fire ecology -- Arizona,
  • Ponderosa pine

  • Edition Notes

    StatementStephen S. Sackett
    SeriesResearch note RM -- 392
    ContributionsRocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station (Fort Collins, Colo.)
    The Physical Object
    Pagination6 p. :
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL13604893M

      Consider two scenarios: One in which a prescribed fire is performed that consumes vegetative fuel before a wildfire occurs, and one in which a wildfire occurs by natural causes before a prescribed fire is performed. Using notation similar to Reed () and Englin, Boxall, and Hauer, let Y(X, T, B) be the value of one rotation (fire to fire).Cited by: Natural fire was the primary historical disturbance influencing structure of forests, but fire regimes have been disrupted since the late s. combined effects of suppression of fire, logging, and grazing by livestock and wildlife altered structure and composition of vegetation within much of the study area from what existed prior to European.

      Progress 10/01/08 to 09/30/09 Outputs OUTPUTS: Activities: Developing resilient ponderosa pine forests using mechanical thinning and prescribed fire. Thinning and prescribed burning are common management practices for reducing fuel build-up in ponderosa pine forests.   Reestablishing historical fire regimes is a high priority for North American coniferous forests, particularly ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) forests are also used extensively for cattle (Bos spp.) ibed fires are being applied on or planned for millions of hectares of these forests to reduce fuel loads, alter forest structure, and maintain and enhance the Cited by:

    Well, under moderate fire weather conditions, many of these natural ignitions can be put back to work thinning under-story vegetation, consuming fuel ladders, and reducing surface fuels. Ideally this is done some distance from the wild-land/urban interface because spatial controls are less certain than with prescribed burning, especially where. Enhance composition of aspen, whitebark pine, and ponderosa pine species and their habitats. Modify fire behavior to enhance community protection while creating conditions that may allow the reestablishment of fire as a natural process on the landscape. Utilize economic value of trees with economic removal. Proposed Action.


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Reducing natural ponderosa pine fuels using prescribed fire by Stephen S Sackett Download PDF EPUB FB2

Reducing natural ponderosa pine fuels using prescribed fire. [Fort Collins, Colo.]: USDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, [] (OCoLC) Reducing natural ponderosa pine fuels using prescribed fire: Two case studies (Research note RM) [Stephen S Sackett] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying : Stephen S Sackett.

Controlled fires could actually save forests and fight climate change In Western forests prone to wildfire, thinning and burning treatments can help reduce wildfire risks and trap carbon in new Author: Conor Gearin. Fire Effects and Fire Ecology: December In a Ponderosa Pine Forest, Prescribed Fires Reduce the Likelihood of Scorched Earth Fire Effects and Fire Ecology: December Forecast for the Southern Boreal Forest: An Increasing Incidence of Severe Disturbance Fuel Treatments: Effects of mastication have been compared with prescribed fire in chaparral (Potts and Stephens, ;Potts et al., ) and with fire and cutting in ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa P.

& C. Costs for Reducing Fuels in Colorado Forest Restoration Projects Dennis L. Lynch1 and Kurt Mackes1 Abstract—The costs to either mechanically remove or mechanically treat forest fuels are examined for various Colorado sites.

In the ponderosa pine and mixed conifer zones, no ideal treatment system exists yet for forest restoration through fuel. Reducing natural ponderosa pine fuels using prescribed fire: two case studies / ([Fort Collins, Colo.]: USDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, []), by Stephen S.

Sackett and Colo.) Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station (Fort. Most of the studies that have analyzed the effects of silvicultural/fuel treatment practices on fire hazard at the stand level rely solely on changes in the structure of the fuel complex to infer. A controlled or prescribed burn, also known as hazard reduction burning, backfire, swailing, or a burn-off, is a fire set intentionally for purposes of forest management, farming, prairie restoration or greenhouse gas abatement.

A controlled burn may also refer to the intentional burning of slash and fuels through burn piles. Fire is a natural part of both forest and grassland ecology and.

crown fires except in the driest ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosaDougl. ex Laws.) forests. Moreover, unless the surface fuels created by using these treatments are themselves treated, intense surface wildfire may result, likely negating positive effects of reducing crown fire potential. No single thinning approach can be applied toCited by: Prescribed fire is one of the most widely advocated management practices for reducing wildfire hazard and has a long and rich tradition rooted in indigenous and local ecological knowledge.

The scientific literature has repeatedly reported that prescribed fire is often the most effective means of achieving such goals by reducing fuels and wildfire hazard and restoring ecological function to Cited by: 7. Fuels treatments in ponderosa pine - Visits to the Boise National Forest and Boise Basin Exp.

Forest. Effectiveness of thinning and prescribed fire in reducing wildfire severity. Philip N. Omi, Erik J. Martinson Book or Chapter or Journal Article.

Anne E. Black, P. Hayes, R. Strickland. prescribed fires on as many acres each year as necessary. These challenges include weather, air quality and smoke management, timing restrictions, wildfire activity, resource availability.

Reducing hazardous fuels through prescribed fire and other tools is one of the key components of the National Fire Plan. Wildfires and outbreaks of native bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae), such as the mountain pine beetle (MPB), Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins, are recognized as two primary disturbances in conifer forests of western North America.

Wildfires have sculpted these forests for millennia, reducing the quantity and continuity of fuels, discouraging establishment of fire-intolerant Cited by: driven tree thinning, shrub mowing, and prescribed fire. • Protect both the forest and nearby homes by restoring forest conditions more likely to support low intensity, stand-maintaining fire behavior characteristic of the ponderosa pine forest type.

• Improve the health of remnant old growth pine trees by removing the small, young. A prescribed fire is the planned use of low-intensity fire to achieve very different goals given certain weather, fuel and topographic conditions (Fernandes et al., ).It is seen as a primary, integrated vegetation management option to mitigate wildfire activity and, thereby, of reducing wildfire carbon emissions (Bennet et al., ).Today, one of the primary objectives of prescribed fires Cited by: In low-elevation ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) and dry Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) forests, average fire intervals have historically ranged from 5 to 20 years, and low to medium intensity fires were common (ArnoSmith and Fisher ).

An important consequence of wildland fire is the production of ash, defined as a continuum of mineral to charred organic residues formed by the burning of wildland fuels.

Ash may impact soil health depending on its elemental composition and other factors, which are influenced by fuel quantity and quality, and by combustion completeness. To investigate how ash properties relate to Cited by: 1.

The Trigo fire burned ha of the Manzano Mountains in central New Mexico in The fire burned with mixed severity through ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) stands on the Cibola National Forest and private burned area exhibited a range of stand densities enabling this research to quantify the relationship between variation in tree density and burn severity using the Composite Cited by: 7.

Several conservation partnerships have been established to restore fire-dependent ecosystems such as grasslands, longleaf pine, and ponderosa pine forests by implementing wildland fire use activities such as prescribed burning and letting wildfires burn (for example, McDonaldRomme et Cited by:.

Exclusion of natural surface fires in warm/dry mixed-conifer forests of the western U.S. has increased potential for stand-replacing crown fires and reduced resilience of these systems to other disturbances, such as drought and insect attack.

Tree thinning and the application of prescribed fire are commonly used to restore more resilient ecological conditions, but currently, there is a lack of.The effects of prescribed burning on dwarf mistletoe in ponderosa pine.

In Proceedings of the Sixth Conference on Fire and Forest Meteorology, Seattle, Wash., 22–24 April Society of American Foresters, Washington, D.C. pp. –Cited by: A cross-section of a Ponderosa pine, showing 20 fire scars since in the open-pine forests of Western Montana.

Fire ecology helps us understand forest ecosystems and thus recognize fire as an intrinsic and necessary force of nature.